Halloween Comparatives and Superlatives

Grammar doesn’t have to be boring! Ask your students to come dressed in their best costumes and practise comparatives and superlatives for short adjectives, using different Halloween objects and creatures.

I love themed lessons. However, I don’t think they should always be the same and focus on the vocabulary. That’s why I’ve prepared a set of worksheets for young learners (Movers level). It will not only refresh the Halloween vocabulary but will also allow them to practise the use of short adjectives as comparatives and superlatives.

At the end of the post, you can download the lesson plan, a set of worksheets (3 pages) and a card game for free. They will help with the reinforcement of the spelling of short adjectives in comparative and superlative forms.

The class starts with the first exercise on the worksheet. You can divide your students into pairs and ask them to find as many Halloween words as they can. If you want to make it a bit more competitive, you can give a time limit and reward them with candy (or another, possibly healthier option) as points. Another way in which you can make this task a bit more engaging is by giving the first letters to the words that your students are looking for. You can make it into a race and point out any spelling mistakes.

The next task can be either done as writing or as speaking. Students read the questions and answer them by looking at the picture. Some of the questions are open-ended and students can give their subjective opinions! For example, some of the learners may find zombies scary meanwhile, others may find them quite cool!

Then you can move on to the next exercise that deals with comparatives of short adjectives. Students read the statements and answer them by saying yes or no. To make this task more engaging, you can draw the Halloween objects and creatures or ask your students to do that for you! If you are currently teaching in a classroom, then you know the joy of drawing on a whiteboard! (Drawing on a Zoom whiteboard is quite fun too).

Once you’ve got your sentences all figured out, ask your students to point out the adjectives and explain the comparatives. Young learners are so intuitive and observant that they will immediately spot the -er pattern! Your task is to show them that even though they all end with -er, there may be some spelling variations, for example, double consonant, or changing -y to -i. To establish this newly-learnt form, ask your students to practise it by writing four short sentences. Check for any errors and always help if necessary.

Moving on to superlatives. You can do it in the same class, or you can separate it into two days. Depending on your group level, sometimes it’s worth dividing the content into a few lessons! Look at the pictures of three skeleton animals and three Halloween costumes. Students read and discuss the questions. This is how the superlatives are introduced. Your learners are already on the lookout, so they may notice them before you say anything!

Once again, students identify any adjectives and write their superlative forms. Since you’ve already discussed different ways of spelling, they’ll immediately answer your questions about the double consonants and -y to -i change. You can supplement this activity with another speaking or writing exercise, just to help your students with any grammar issues. The last task is reading about the Ghost family. Students read the text filled with superlatives and fill in the gaps with the corresponding family members.

You can end this class by playing Black Peter! I used to love playing this game as a child. It’s ideal for groups of 4-5 students. Each student gets 6-7 cards and randomly chooses one card from the person to the left. If they have a set of three cards – an adjective, a comparative and a superlative (e.g. big, bigger, the biggest), they say the sentence using one of the forms and get a point! Be careful! There is a Black Peter card that doesn’t have a pair! A student with the Black Peter card is the loser. These cards can be also used to play memory or any other variation of Black Peter. The choice is yours!

That sums up my Halloween grammar class. Do you teach Halloween-themed classes? Do you teach the vocabulary and play games, or do you take this opportunity to still cover any grammar points? I hope you enjoyed my lesson! Download all the files for free below! If you are looking for the full version of the Halloween worksheet on comparatives and superlatives, head to my TpT store and get it today!