B1 – Choosing a Place to Live

A quick update on the new group lessons on Preply – they aren’t going as well as I hoped for. To have a class, you need at least two people to sign up for the class. Unfortunately, I keep getting stuck on one student only! This hasn’t stopped me from continuing with group lesson planning and developing my courses. After all, I can always use those plans with my private students.

The second lesson of the My Space, My Place course is about choosing the right place to live. In this lesson, students talk about their current houses or flats and discuss which additional features they would like to have in their future housing. To expose students to authentic language experience, this class is based on two short videos in which two real estate agents talk about existing properties and all the features included. This should prepare students to look for their ideal place and help them with the language needed to describe their housing needs.

Scroll to the end of the post to get the lesson plan and the presentation.

Start the lesson by revising the housing vocabulary. Look at the main rooms in the house and brainstorm as many words associated with these rooms (objects and furniture) in pairs or small groups. This should provide a good warm-up and put the students into the mindset of speaking in English from the very beginning.

Since the class relies heavily on videos and listening, I think that it’s good to let students speak for as long as possible. Then slowly transition from the warm-up to a group discussion. Allow students to talk about the houses and flats they live in right now. Think about the features they are missing in their current locations and what they would like to have in their future accommodation, for example, a spacious kitchen or two sinks in the bathroom. Let the imagination run loose!

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Proceed by watching two authentic videos of real estate agents presenting two flats, in Reading and Milan. It is a great opportunity to listen to a native and a non-native speaker using the target language naturally. If you watch the videos on YouTube, you can use subtitles in case there are any difficulties with understanding. Before turning on the videos, ask the following questions: What are the benefits and drawbacks of each accommodation? Which place would you prefer to live in?

After discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each location and choosing the place students would like to live in, watch the videos one more time, this time focusing on details. Show questions regarding both flats and decide whether they refer to the place in Reading, Milan, or both. Some of the questions are: Which flat is fully furnished? Which flat is conveniently located? Which place is brand new?

Practise some new vocabulary by reading three short flat descriptions and filling the gaps with the words. I wanted accommodation descriptions that are real and commonly seen online. I found and adapted three from the website Eat, Sleep, Wander. Once the descriptions are completed, students work individually and match them with three types of people looking for a new place to live: a businessperson, two university students and a couple with a dog. Students present their decisions and justify their choices.

The class ends with a short roleplay. One of the students acts as a potential renter who describes their situation and needs. Students get to choose one of the three roles: a family of four, a couple and a single businessperson. The real estate agent presents their three flats and chooses the one that best suits their needs. If you have more time, you can also ask students to present their actual situation and needs and pick a place that would be best for them in real life.

In case you have some extra time left, there are additional group class discussion questions in which students describe their perfect location and what features they would like to have in their ideal accommodation. Encourage students to use newly learnt vocabulary.

If you liked this lesson plan, make sure to have a look at Lesson 1 – Our Home, Our World. Click below to download the files!

B1 – Our Home, Our World

The unthinkable has happened! On 12th September, I received a mysterious e-mail from someone from Preply, inviting me to be one of the course tutors. Obviously, I accepted! How could I not? I’ve been teaching Preply ready-made group lessons for about five months now, and it felt like the next natural step in my online teaching career.

After being a bit sceptical and verifying that the message was a real invitation from Preply, I followed all the necessary steps to be a part of this experience. Immediately I took it to Twitter to get some topic course ideas. My first instinct was either environment or celebrity gossip/pop culture. However, this quickly changed as I was asked to provide a short description of the 1-10 hour long course. Since my first idea was to go with the flow, I had to actually sit down and figure it out ASAP.

I had a look at all existing courses to avoid any repetition. There were a few on food, breaking news, and job interviews… The list goes on! I decided to design a six-hour course on housing. The course ranges from describing unusual accommodations, talking about our dream houses, everyday language to rent a house and talking about the problems and future of housing. Below you can see a list of lessons from the B1 course titled My Space, My Place.

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You can download the lesson plan and the presentation at the end of the post!

The class starts by looking at and labelling four different types of accommodations: a houseboat, a block of flats, a chalet and a motorhome. Students take turns talking about one of them, discussing possible features that can be found in each one of them, e.g. a spacious kitchen, beautiful views, convenience, etc. Ask which one of them looks most like their house and which one they would choose to stay in for a short holiday.

Follow this short warm-up discussion by showing pictures and reading a short introduction to an article from Earth Homes Now on cave homes. Despite the text being short as it is, I reduced it even more for the sake of the class, focusing more on speaking rather than reading. After this brief introduction, discuss if students are surprised about the cave homes being still used now. Divide students into pairs/small groups and ask them to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of living in a cave. This activity serves as an introduction to reading for gist in the next part.

Students return to the main room / their desks and begin individual work. They read the rest of the article on the pros and cons of living in the cave home. Elicit the answers (you can write them down) and check if any of the students’ ideas appeared in the text. There are four advantages and two disadvantages mentioned in the text: natural sound insulation, warm in the winter and cool in the summer, cheap to build, natural protection from intruders, but also the risk of collapsing and no natural light.

All Preply group lessons have some kind of focus on grammar. I decided to use it as a revision of comparatives. Students are introduced to comparatives in the next activity, reading for gist. Show six sentences, all containing comparatives and ask them to decide if the sentences are true (T), false (F) or the information isn’t given in the text. Then go over the rules and spelling of comparative forms. Practice the use of grammar by writing three sentences comparing living in a cave and living in a block of flats. I chose a block of flats, as almost everyone has some kind of experience living in such a place, but of course, feel free to change it as needed!

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Finish this part of the lesson by discussing the following questions about living in a cave house: Would you like to live in a cave house? How is living in a cave house different from living in your current location? What would you miss the most if you lived in a cave house or another unusual place mentioned in the class? Monitor the activity and provide students with speaking feedback at the end of it.

If you’ve got enough time left, you can put students into pairs and discuss the differences between houseboats and chalets. This is an optional activity that can be also used earlier during the lesson as grammar practice.

So what do you think about my first lesson in the course? You can find the slides and the lesson plan down below! Stay tuned for more classes.